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Why can’t it be about each of those things?

Inevitably, too many have forgotten to mourn with those who mourn. Instead they have moved directly into the politicization.

So, first, mourn.

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Keep mourning.

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More.

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Feel something other than anger.

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Keep feeling.

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And once we have properly humbled ourselves and practiced grace and love and empathy and compassion… and recognize we can never do it with the sufficiency required… then we can consider our response.

So far, the reactions have been as varied as they are fervent.

Some think the Orlando shooting is about American gun culture—the ease with which a person can buy an AR-15. Others say this is about radical Islam. Some say this is about the Second Amendment. Other say it’s about homophobia.

Some call the shooter a lone wolf. Some a jihadist.

Some say what he did is a hate crime. Some say it’s an act of terror.

I want to know: Why can’t it be all of those things?

The line between terrorism and hate crimes is incredibly thin, and sometimes doesn’t exist at all. When a guy shoots up a Sikh temple or a US military installation or an Amish church, might there be a personal vitriolic vendetta (as in a hate crime) and a political, fear-inspiring agenda (as in terror)? I don’t understand why these are so often portrayed as mutually exclusive.

In the same way, it seems obvious that the gunman was out to harm LGBT individuals (interesting in light of the suggestion by some news outlets that he himself was gay). That doesn’t negate the allegation that he also pledged allegiance to Islamic State.

It’s not one or the other. This is not political fodder for the gay community or the gun reform crowd, nor for NRA proponents or those opposed to the immigration of Muslims. It’s bigger than each of those things. It encompasses them all.

Obviously, gay Americans are going to be angry in a different way than Islamophobic Americans, but they will both be angry. And they have real reasons to be. We all do. As the President said, this is an attack on all Americans, on a way of life that is bigger than sexuality or creed. We should only hope the collective anger is not inappropriately lobby-ized or used to tear down others.

To be sure, lobbying—getting political—is an appropriate response here. We do need gun reform. We do need more innovative and effective answers for radicalization. Above all, we need more love. Such endeavors are not at odds.

It would serve us well, in the days ahead, to acknowledge the issues, not only our issue.

Access to guns is the issue. Homophobia is the issue. Radicalism is the issue.

True, they may be the issue in different ways.

Access to guns is the means. Homophobia is the message. Radicalism is the motive.

But all three need to be addressed.

And we must keep solidarity.

I’m worried that we, as a country, are forgetting how to answer when asked, “Who is your neighbor?” I remember past mass shootings and terror attacks in America when, after they happened, the country united. Today, we are letting it tear us apart.

We need to love. We need to live. We need to stay together. Not because of some demonized or politicized common enemy, but because of a very real common good.

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